Artists & Painters

Online Directory of recommended members of The MAW Network who are Artists & Painters including their contact details & social media links.

Photo of Jacqueline Rooney Art

Jacqueline Rooney Art

Contact: Jacqueline Wilson
Work 6 Cherry Hill Rostrevor Co. Down BT34 3 BD Cell Phone: 07513865203 Website: Website

Biography

I’m a 40 year old artist and mother of 2 beautiful boys-Finn (3) and Evan (almost 2) and wife to an ever supportive husband! For as long as I could hold a pencil I was drawing everything I saw around me which lead me to complete my degree in Fine Art and Education (quite) a few years ago!

Throughout my busy career as an Art teacher I have been determined to continue my own love of painting holding 5 solo exhibitions of my work to date. Having gone through an eventful and busy few years lately I decided to take a career break to immerse myself in motherhood and focus on my own Art (between naps and nappies !)

My passion for Art and Interiors is evident in so much of my work and I love to advise clients on the best piece of my Art to compliment and complete their home.

 

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6 Cherry Hill Rostrevor Co. Down BT34 3 BD

Artists & Painters who are members

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Mums at Work Members

Ten Top Tips for Creating a Successful Business as an Artist or Painter

1. Create great work

This is where it all starts. Without good work you can’t expect to create a successful career or business. You need to be very clear about what it is you are making, and who you are making it for.

2. Get to know your target market

Once you understand your own work and what you have to offer, it’s time to start finding the right market for it.

As with every other business you need to find out as much as you can about who might want to buy your art—locally, nationally, internationally. You need to stay in touch with new developments in the art industry, how the economy in various places is affecting art buyers, etc.

Here are some questions you should be asking yourself:

How big is your potential market?

Customers buying art?

Competitors selling art?

Who is your competition (i.e., producing similar work) and what sort of prices are they getting for their work?

The individuals you want your audience to be?

Where does your work fit in the broader art marketplace?

What type of spaces do you want your work to be seen in?

3. Get to know your marketplace

I define the “art marketplace” as anywhere your work can be placed on public view. These can be broken into 3 distinct groups:

Public exhibition spaces – Public art galleries, museums, libraries, open submission competitions, etc.

Commercial gallery spaces – These can range from local framing galleries up to international galleries.

Direct access spaces – Anywhere people can come to you directly to see your work, such as your studio, art fairs, your website, etc.

The more you know about your market and your marketplace, the better off you’ll be when making decisions about creating and showing your work.

4. Develop a simple business plan

“A what? I’m an artist, I’ve never done a business plan!”

Well now is the time to start. . . and it can be as simple as answering a few questions. After all, where do you want to be in 1 , 3 and 5 years? Having a clear vision for your future will help you create goals and stay focused in the long run.

Write down your answers to the following questions:

What do you expect to earn from your work over the next 12 months?

In what months will the money come in?

Will you manage during months when nothing is coming in?

How much work will you need to sell in order to meet your income goals?

The Amount of work will you need to make in order to sell that amount? (If you can sell 50% of what you make you are doing really well. . . but that means you need to make twice as much as you hope to sell!)

5. Regularly review your business plan

Think of your business plan as a map, and refer to it every now and then to make sure you are still on course.

For example, if you had planned for a certain income coming in the first 3 months of the year and it doesn’t come in then you have to find a way of making that up in the remaining 9 months.

6. Create fans by creating opportunities

At some point, you’ll need customers, but first you’ll need fans. . . and you create fans by generating as many opportunities as possible for people to view your work. Of course, fans come in many shapes and sizes:

Admirers – These are people who simply like your work and may never be in a position to invest in it. But they will champion it! Instagram is one of the best ways to create new admirers.

Art community fans – Here are people in a position to help progress your career, e.g., media, curators, major collectors, or other artists.

Future customers – These start off as fans, but at some point will invest in your work. It could be in 6 months time, it could be 2 years, but they have already committed in their own minds to buying your work at some point in the future.

Actual customers – Obviously, customers are just people who make such a connection with your work that they are willing to invest in it. In the art world, they’re known as collectors.

No matter what type of fan a person is, they all have to start at the same place—seeing your work via the opportunities you have created.

If you ever stop creating those opportunities, your business, your career will simply die away. Creating new, ongoing opportunities may be the single most important thing you can do, other than create the work itself.

Here are some example opportunities 

Giving out Business Cards at Networking Events

Attending Exhibitions and Showcase Events

Attending Xmas Events & Exhibitions

Hosting Studio Open Days

Posted new images to your Facebook account

Going to events for Artists Only

Update your Website with your new work

Set up an account with Linkedin and join groups online for artists and business owners

Connecting with Journalists

Hosting solo exhibitions

Create YouTube Videos showcasing you in action

Create some slideshows of your work and post to YouTube

Connect with managers of arts councils and managers

Resell to past clients

Join Twitter Hours

7. Make it easy for your fans to “connect” with you.

If someone sees your work for the first time—due to one of the many opportunities you have created—and decides that they really like what they see, then there is a good chance that they will be interested in seeing more.

This means having a website that people can visit at their leisure. Ideally, this is your own website or blog—one that offers a rich and rewarding experience to the viewer. Social media sites such as Facebook and Instagram can be useful places to show your work but they do not offer they same professional experience to the viewer.

All of the opportunities you create up to this point have one simple objective—to drive people to your website.

8. Wait for “connections” to turn into customers

If you can get people to really connect with your work,it can be just a question of having patience. At some point they are very likely to invest in you. It could be a €100 print, it could be a €1000 painting, it could be a place in one of your workshops. The challenge is to create something that someone just can’t walk away from!

9. Nurture your customers

Your customers, your clients, your collectors—the people who invest in your work and in your career—are the most important people you will deal with in the course of your career.

Put your customers first, not the galleries, not the media, not the art community—and let them know they are your top priority. As with all businesses your existing customers are where most of your new business will come from, whether through new sales, recommendations, the championing of your work, or just introducing your work to new people.

Whenever possible, offer special discounts, private previews of upcoming shows, studio visits, etc. Keep your customers updated on your plans and successes.

10. Go back to step 1 and repeat all 10 steps again.

Being a professional artist is a never ending cycle.

Always create good work, continually review your market and marketplace to see where you want to be in the coming months, write down a business plan that will allow you meet your goals for the year, and never stop making opportunities that will bring people to see your work.

Eventually the opportunities you create will turn into connections, and then into sales, and then into repeat customers. It’s not always simple or easy, but it works!

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